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The Abandoned Chocolate Factory by Sebastian Liste

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Sebastian Listen is a Brazil based Spanish born photographer who spent years on an assignment documenting the lives of dozens of families that occupied an abandoned chocolate factory in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. Below are some of the images that he captured over the years that tell a story of despair. In a world where so much money is created and wasted on a daily basis its sad to see that the poor always get forgotten about.

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Young couples drink beer on a Sunday evening. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

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A child looks out to the courtyard of the factory from his house. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

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Vanessa, 13, reunites with her mother. Vanessas mother abandoned her when she was six years old. A few years later, Vanessa began prostituting herself to survive. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

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Men fight with knives and wooden sticks over debt problems. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

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Noemia, 38, smokes on her sofa. She is a drug addict and is mentally handicapped, working as a cook and prostitue to survive after her husband and brother died in a car accident. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

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A young girl plays with a dog in the courtyard of her home. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

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Ana celebrating her sixth birthday. She was born and has grown up inside the abandoned chocolate factory. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

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A man shows a scar after his wife attacked him upon hearing that he was sleeping with another woman in their house. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

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Children play in the courtyard of the factory at night. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

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Two young girls look through a wall destroyed during the last rainy season. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

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Maria, 16, smokes crack. Since she was 8 years old, she has prostitued herself for drugs. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

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Young girls fight over a shared boyfriend. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

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Leo and Ericarlos families leave the occupied factory in a van with all their goods. In March 2011, the government evicted 100 families from the factory. (Photo: Sebastian Liste)

Source: Time Magazine





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